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Zhongguo Chapu 中国茶谱

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The first really good book about Chinese tea I found is called Zhongguo Chapu and was published in 2007. It is almost 300 pages long and describes about 200 kinds of tea. The problem is I do not know a word of Chinese, and the machine translations I tested is very tiresome. If someone wants to help us to translate selected parts you are welcome to contact...

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Te som konst

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The best book on China’s history of tea I read is actually the Swedish. It translates into “tea art” and was written by Mette Siggstedt 1996 in connection with a very nice exhibition on tea in the East Asian Museum in Stockholm. The book is small, black, fairly insignificant and not so easy to read but who cares when it summarizes China’s entire history of tea in 127 pages. The author is no expert on tea but she has access to an outstanding amount of Chinese literature and also has an excellent ability to summarize and draw conclusions. She is also critical and perceptive when it comes to the Chinese and European literary sources. The fact that she has a very good knowledge of Chinese history and culture course contributes to the book’s qualities. What is objectionable is the lack of maps and that it requires fairly extensive knowledge of China’s...

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Te – Från Sencha till Lapsang

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This is a really nice Swedish tea book that was published a few years ago (2006). The book is written by food writer Petter Bjerke and to some extent Vernon Mauris who runs the store “The Tea Centre of Stockholm”. The book should be seen as an introduction to good tea and as such it makes a good job. It is both well written, beautiful and entertaining and takes up most of the teas that you can buy in a good Swedish tea shop. It also takes up part of tea culture in China and Japan and because Petter’s food writer, there is a recurring theme of how the tea and food work together. A little sadder with the book is that it does not come with any new information. All it does is to summarize the knowledge that already exists in so many other places, in books, on websites and in tea shops. It looks indeed like Petter traveled to a couple of the classic tea areas but it would have been much more interesting if the author had actually worked with tea. Apart from this, I can recommend the book, especially as it only costs half as much as just a few years...

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All the Tea In China

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When this book came almost 25 years ago, it quickly became a reference work and I have even seen Chinese tea merchants use. The first half is perhaps not so remarkable, it takes up the history of tea culture and some mandatory things like chemistry, ceramics and health effects. The book’s strength is the last 60 pages that take up no less than 50 different more or less famous Chinese teas. After 25 year much of the information is outdated. The China Tea Import and Export Corporation lost its role, but if you ignore this, it is still one of the best books written about Chinese tea, especially in...

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TEKULT OCH TEKULTUR

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This is a nice little Swedish book about the Swedish tea culture. It is written by Birgitta and Cia Conradson and was puplished in 1994. The book describes in a very personal tea drinking seen in Sweden from the 1700s to the early 1990s. Most of the information, both the many pictures and description of the Swedish people’s drinking habits are taken from the Nordic Museum’s stash, perhaps not surprising because the book is published by the Nordic Museum...

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Darjeeling Tea – The Golden Brew

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This is an impressive work about one of the world’s best teas, Darjeeling. The book is nearly 600 pages long, was written by Gangadhar Banerjee and Srijeet Banerjee came out in 2007. Unfortunately, the book is hopelessly dull and contains almost no useful information, at least not for a private person. Sure, it contains some of Darjeeling earliest history and some anecdotes about tea personalities but it does not address anything about the tea plantations, on how to make tea or whatever it is that makes it unique. Instead, the list endless amounts of uninteresting sales, wages and comparisons with other tea producing areas. It does not contain a single illustration...

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